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RogueSolace

Wound Guide for Role Playing

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Note: I'll come back and make the charts bigger later, have to leave for work!

 

 

 

Wound Guide for Role Playing

 

This guide is to help understand the actual wounds certain weaponry make, in order to use better judgement in roleplay. Both for attack, and injuries.

I’m going to use several books to cover various types of injuries and the damage they cause. This gives you a lot of information to roleplay with in how you decide to use weaponry or wounds. A lot of material is simply going to be copied to make it easier to read and understand.

The majority of this book is either quoted directly, or condensed from multiple books. I will be sure to list them all at the end, but this will be too complicated to provide actual cites for each statement.

 

 

Part 1: anatomy and science of wounds

 

 

Projectile/Ballistics / Bullets 

 

What kind of damage does a bullet actually do? In most RP cases, it’s a straight in, straight out, usually nothing damaged case. The reality couldn’t be more opposite. I do have to think this is in relation though more to how many trigger happy players we have IC. Bullet wounds are far, far more devastating than role played out to be, with makes sense considering too many people are all too happy to simply shoot you. Personally I think a lot more actual study into psychology needs to happen because honestly, that’s not how so many people would be reacting, especially so suddenly. That is another topic though, that of which there are many debates already upon the forms for.

So, how does a bullet actually hurt you?

Bullets cause damage primarily via crushing, and stretching. The bullet/projectile does damage by first crushing tissue. This hole or missile track represents the so called permanent cavity. Dimension are roughly about the same size for all tissues. After the passage of the projectile, the walls of the permanent cavity are temporarily stretched outward. The maximum tissue displacement is the temporary cavity. Any damage from the temporary cavity is due to stretching the tissue. The result in temporarily displaced tissue is blunt force trauma. Damage is figured by measuring of both.

 

 

image.png.8643adb24388cfdb261fc8a689db7374.png

 

 

 

 

 

Misconceptions:

Some people think that only more modern, higher velocity projectiles produce temporary cavitation.  This is NOT true as the diagram below of an 1870-1890 Vetterli deforming bullet.  A larger exit-than-entry is not actually evidence for increased velocity. Velocity highest at the smaller entry wound, and less at the greater exit wound. Multiple other factors contribute to the damage the bullet does, including yaw, projectile fragmentation, etc.

 

 

 

image.thumb.png.881358d2a7950f69f033ddf30594984b.png

 

Construction:

 

image.thumb.png.d250028ee0a5e9ed0ea293d4a877de18.png

 

 

 

Bullet Flight and Kinetic Energy:

Once shot, several things affect the bullet in flight that can have large differences between damage.

·         Spinning and given stability

·         Distance

·         Air drag

·         Crosswind directions

·         Raindrops hitting bullet

·         Hitting obstacles before target

 

image.png.8c27c8c645c35dcf06ea734759bb5c28.png

 

Yaw: the nose of the bullet moving up and down, away from the line of

Flight, and describes an angle with the target surface at impact.

 

Obstacles: bullets routinely hit obstacles during flight, this causes

ricochet.

 

Ricochet: the bullet from impact is given a small ‘push’ that destabilizes it. Can create yaw and tumbling. If the push is strong enough, the bullet can even be deformed or broken into fragments before hitting the target, if it hits the target at all.

 

Kinetic Energy

Any moving object has kinetic energy. Total kinetic energy

Is the potential for causing damage, while transferred

kinetic damage is the capacity to cause damage.

 

image.png.b43150ab3f2034370e586d6870b05c7d.png

 

Actual tissue damage, however, depends on the efficiency of

the energy transfer.

 

Kinetic Energy Formula

 

image.png.60493a35c2475bbddb67aef15b00dbfa.png

 

Kinetic Energy Impact Formula

 

image.png.dd3acb20266e623f54dfc4253d517ac3.png

 

 

If there is no exit, then v(2) = 0, and all kinetic energy has been transferred. If the bullet breaks up into fragments, then the mass (m) also changes, and E(kexp) is modified.

·         Low energy – knife or hand-energized missiles

·         Medium energy- handguns

·         High energy- military or hunting rifles, with a muzzle velocity above 600m/s or a large mass of projectile.

 

Bullet Damage Via Types of Guns:

 

image.thumb.png.ebf09a2891c7078161e3a334fd25ed17.png

image.thumb.png.2aaaadba5dd06073ff8e41eb861d1902.png

 

image.thumb.png.b7e597ae6dc5a226519c529973cd534c.png

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Long Rifle

 

 

image.png.7c0e6c61a776bcb1a8d69f1b1374af8b.png

 

 

Special

 

 

 

image.png.0c2a4e5df3d4bee9127cca8cb5663e04.png

 

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image.thumb.png.00716f92c1a1964c15a24570cf86f7aa.png

 

 

 

NATO 7.62

 

image.png.275e6f839e6c735b8b008ec565e054b2.png

 

AK-47

image.png.837af28e03b034d7e27d12dba22c9e9d.png

 

 

AK-74

 

image.png.deab2922a60a6770e621b68486542da7.png

 

 

 

357 Magnum JSP

 

image.png.d3e9611666870364115ac992d8015c48.png

 

22 CAL FMC (M-193 bullet shot from M-16A 1 assault rifle).

 

image.png.d37d59ae3c5bca7e8517d76572daffe2.png

 

 

.224 Soft-point (M-16)

 

image.png.adfb450a123d9676be1d5277307d152e.png

 

 

Fragments

A moving projectile has kinetic energy. When the projectile enters the human body, it releases energy to the tissues thus causing a wound. There are two types of wounding projectiles: bullets and metallic fragments (or splinters, such as shards and shrapnel).

Fragment Wounds

Exploding bombs, shells, rockets, grenades, sub munitions, and some landmines, produce metal fragments from the weapon casing (primary projectile). In modern weapons the casing is scored, creating weak points that break off easily on explosion. Other shrapnel can be added such as nails, bolts, steel pellets, or any other metallic debris.

Fragments are shot off at very high speed, which decreases rapidly with distance travelled. The farther the victim is from the explosion, the more superficial the wounds. At very close range, multiple high-energy fragments combined with the blast effect create mutilating injuries and are often fatal.

Explosions may cause stones or bricks to break up, shatter glass panes, or force of the blast can transport other debris (secondary projectiles). Fragment wounds are usually  multiple and the wound tract is always widest at the entry. There may or may not be an exit wound.

 

image.png.cb38bb55430ad8f1dc91bddee0c85930.png

 

Explosions/Bombs

 

image.thumb.png.f4ea4412a55ce6cc5ef3bba0e11364b3.png

 

 

 

Explosive blast injuries

The detonation of high-energy explosives creates a travelling pressure blast wave in the air, (or in water for underwater explosions). The wave causes rapid and large changes in the outside atmospheric pressure: the positive pressure shock wave is followed by a negative pressure phase (Figure 3.5). Immediately behind the pressure wave is a mass movement of air: the blast wind. As the blast wave passes any unprotected person it affects all parts of the body, especially those normally containing air. A victim of blast may not have any external injury. A single, large explosion may injure many people at the same time. Explosions in a closed space (building, bus, etc.) are more fatal than those out in the open.

 

Categorization of blast injuries

Blast injuries are commonly categorized into four types.

 

1.      Primary

These are direct pressure effects. Rupture of the tympanic membrane is the most common injury. Rupture of the lung alveoli and their capillaries (“blast lung”) is the most lethal injury amongst survivors.

 

2.      Secondary

These injuries include missile wounds. Fragments may arise from the bomb casing or contents (primary missiles). Home-made bombs (improvised explosive devices, known as IED) may be packed with nuts and bolts, screws and ball bearings. In addition, the blast wind may mobilize various objects (secondary missiles) that then cause penetrating wounds.

 

3.      Tertiary

These effects are directly due to the blast wind. It can cause total body disintegration in the immediate vicinity of the explosion; traumatic amputations and evisceration further away. The wind can make buildings collapse or throw people against objects. Trauma may be blunt, crush or penetrating.

 

4.      Quaternary

Miscellaneous types of harm due to burns, asphyxia from carbon monoxide or toxic gases, or the inhalation of dust, smoke or contaminants. The various injuries caused by major blasts cover a whole spectrum of trauma and many patients suffer several injuries from a variety of effects: i.e. multiple injuries from one single weapon system.

 

Other situations of blast injuries

The blast wave travels more rapidly and much further in water than in air. Blast injuries in water occur at greater distances and can be more severe. Moreover, underwater explosions tend to cause pure primary blast injury. A “fuel air explosive” – the liquid explosive material is dispersed in the air like an aerosol and then ignited – also tends to bring about pure primary blast injury and quaternary effects due to the consumption of all oxygen in the nearby air. The blast effect of a marine mine exploding below an icy surface, or the “deck slap” of a ship hit by a torpedo, produces a shock wave that can severely fracture the bones of anyone on deck or inside the ship. Similarly, some anti-tank mines send a blast wave through the floor of the vehicle causing closed fractures of the foot and leg. The foot appears like a “bag of bones” inside intact skin, which was described in World War I as “pied de mine”: a mine foot. Anti-personnel blast mines have a local blast effect, vaporizing the tissues of the contact foot, as described previously.

 

 

image.thumb.png.93bcb4a2d0c59fcc3be239cf701fdab3.png

image.thumb.png.817e10f7985f3ac8307f9d8f0f37a37c.png

 

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image.thumb.png.d62e400ba1387ef5772c1d6f4d8809ac.png

 

image.thumb.png.28a44c76f6f4fa71dee40b2fc183d845.png

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image.thumb.png.8609965ddf1b5d6babbcf65842efc8b7.png

image.thumb.png.d73d552bf751a6816bcebf9cbbfadab6.png

 

 

image.thumb.png.9a471d2b5b1abffae4afd7d4d998b5e5.png

 

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Burns

 

 

 

 

 

image.thumb.png.87a04761654f0e2bb7f2d7ed9f122f81.png

 

 

 

 

TBC

 

Edited by RogueSolace

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Hey, some feedback here, Maybe lighten it up a little, and instead of focusing on types of injuries, mechanics and physics, suggest/show ways of RPing it ingame- examples, tips, etc... 

you can't expect a normal person to distinguish the type of bullet he was shot with, the hole size, how it affected his insides, the velocity, how it fragmented, if burned the magnitude, or if hit by an explosion, the physics of a blast, and how it can rip limbs.  

all he knows is hes been shot he has a hole inside him/ hes been burned/hit by a mine, grenade, other and it looks this and that and feels this and that, and that he needs a doctor, maybe the guide should focus more on those, and how to RP it, rather than physics of a projectile, the magnitude of burns, how a blast can rip off a leg, or other... 

Also focus your guide on the mentality of an injured person, panic, breathing heavily, loss of consciousness, shock, fear, and how it feels (Pain).

other than that its a great idea to create a guide for injured RP. - good luck!

  

 

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Thank you for the feedback :-) and will do, I fully intend to put a lot more what you're talking about Indy here this to be continued I just I'm sort of doing it in parts because of how large it is. I appreciate the feedback :-)

also I am by no means expecting anyone to be able to figure out what kind of bullet, velocity, etc. the wound is whatsoever. I'm putting it in to show the different kinds of damage that can occur especially internally, that way it can also help give people ideas on what kind of injuries they want to RP.

Edited by RogueSolace

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Great job! And I agree with Pep. 

 Bullet wounds are far, far more devastating than role played out to be, with makes sense considering too many people are all too happy to simply shoot you. Personally I think a lot more actual study into psychology needs to happen because honestly, that’s not how so many people would be reacting, especially so suddenly. That is another topic though, that of which there are many debates already upon the forms for.

Maybe a really condensed guide of what you are writing about should be a part of the lore/rules mandatory read, to change the view of "trigger happyness". I figure that in a real life scenario like this people would die from all kinds of everyday injuries, simply because they can't get the proper care. So, people would be really careful to not get hurt. 

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Literally me scrolling through this.images.jpg.3db15354dee6bd1ebada908fcadd7abe.jpg

 

In all seriousness though it was very detailed but very confusing, but applauds for effort.

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This should be a must read for people who like hardcore medical RP and/or play as a doctor, surgeon or combat medic! By the way where are the pages from?

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Lol not a doctor, had health problems my whole life and been a caregiver for half of it. I'm familiar with a lot of stuff, though most of this is new.

I'm going to work in condensing :) i was honestly curious to see if this even got positive feedback before putting the effort in

its from a combination of three books. Go to the other guide I just posted, jump all the way down to the bottom where the links are, and find books/war surgery. All three should be listed there. I'll add references later here

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18 hours ago, RogueSolace said:

Lol not a doctor, had health problems my whole life and been a caregiver for half of it. I'm familiar with a lot of stuff, though most of this is new.

I'm going to work in condensing :) i was honestly curious to see if this even got positive feedback before putting the effort in

its from a combination of three books. Go to the other guide I just posted, jump all the way down to the bottom where the links are, and find books/war surgery. All three should be listed there. I'll add references later here

The guide is still amazing even tho it's long 

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I would not be able to read all that even if I did try but that looks really well done if people want to go into proper medical RP and you would have the type to put that much into it good job ^_^

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