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Roosky

Roosky's Guide to Combat In An Urban Setting

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Roosky    0

First off, let me start by telling you this is going to be a long guide, If you don't have 15-20 minutes to read it, you won't catch it all. The main reason I wanted to make this guide is to give people an edge in combat scenarios, and get people out of the, "Oh shit run away!" Mindset.

Section 1. Movement

[align=left]          Movement in urban areas is the first fundamental skill that anyone should work on. To reduce exposure to enemy fire, the person avoids open areas, avoids silhouetting himself, and selects his next covered position before movement.

[align=left]1-1. CROSSING OPEN AREAS

[align=justify]          Open areas, such as streets, alleys, and parks, should be avoided. They are natural kill zones for enemy combatants or snipers. They can be crossed safely if the individual or small-unit leader applies certain fundamentals including using smoke from hand grenades  to conceal movement. 

[align=justify]a.) Before moving to another position, the person makes a visual reconnaissance, selects the position offering the best cover and concealment, and determines the route he takes to get to that position.

b.) The person develops a plan for his own movement. He runs the shortest distance between buildings and moves along the far building to the next position, reducing the time he is exposed to enemy fire.

[align=left]1-2. MOVEMENT PARALLEL TO BUILDINGS

          Personnel and groups may not always be able to use the inside of buildings as routes of advance and must move on the outside of the buildings . Smoke, suppressive fires, and cover and concealment should be used to hide movement. The person moves parallel to the side of the building (maintaining at least 12 inches of separation between himself and the wall to avoid ricochets), stays in the shadow, presents a low silhouette, and moves rapidly to his next position. If an enemy  inside the building fires on a person, he exposes himself to fire from other group members providing overwatch. An enemy combatant farther down the street would have difficulty detecting and engaging the person.

[align=left]1-3. MOVEMENT AROUND CORNERS

          The area around a corner must be observed before the person moves. The most common mistake a person can make at a corner is allowing his weapon to extend beyond the corner exposing his position (this mistake is known as flagging your weapon). He should show his head below the height an enemy combatant would expect to see it.  The best corner clearing technique that is used when speed is required is the pie-ing method. This procedure is done by aiming the weapon beyond the corner into the direction of travel (without flagging) and side-stepping around the corner in a circular fashion with the muzzle as the pivot point.

396x248http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/policy/army/fm/3-06-11/image1251.gif[/img]

[align=left]1-4. USE OF DOORWAYS

Doorways should not be used as entrances or exits since they are normally covered by enemy fire. If a person must use a doorway as an exit, he should move quickly to his next position, staying as low as possible to avoid silhouetting himself. Preselection of positions, speed, a low silhouette, and other factors should be emphasized when exiting doorways.

[align=left]

Section 2. Clearing

2-1. CONSIDERATIONS FOR ENTRY

[align=justify]          It is not advised to have more than 4 people clearing a room as it can get very crowded and would be very unwieldy. The entire team enters the room as quickly and smoothly as possible and clears the doorway immediately. If possible, the team moves from a covered or concealed position already in their entry order. Ideally, the team arrives and passes through the entry point without having to stop.

[align=justify]a.) The door is the focal point of anyone in the room. It is known as the fatal funnel, because it focuses attention at the precise point where the individual team members are the most vulnerable. Moving into the room quickly reduces the chance anyone being hit by enemy fire directed at the doorway.

[align=justify]b.) On the signal to go, the clearing team moves from covered or concealed positions through the door quickly and takes up positions inside the room that allow it to completely dominate the room and eliminate the threat. Team members stop movement only after they have cleared the door and reached their designated point of domination. The first man's position is deep into the near corner of the room. The depth of his movement is determined by the size of the room, any obstacles in the room, such as furniture, and by the number and location of enemy and noncombatants in the room.

[align=justify]c.) To make precision room clearing techniques work, each member of the team must know his sector of fire and how his sector overlaps and links with the sectors of the other team members. Team members do not move to the point of domination and then engage their targets. They engage targets as they move to their designated point. However, engagements must not slow movement to their points of domination. Team members may shoot from as short a range as 1 to 2 inches. They engage the most immediate enemy threats first. Examples of immediate threats are enemy personnel who—

  • Are armed and prepared to return fire immediately.

  • Block movement to the position of domination.

  • Are within arm's reach of a clearing team member.

  • Are within 3 to 5 feet of the breach point.

[align=justify]d.) Each clearing team member has a designated sector of fire unique to him initially and expands to overlap sectors of the other team members.

[align=justify](1) The number 1 and number 2 men are initially concerned with the area directly to their front, then along the wall on either side of the door or entry point. This area is in their path of movement, and it is their primary sector of fire. Their alternate sector of fire is from the wall they are moving toward, back to the opposite far corner.

[align=justify](2) The number 3 and number 4 men start at the center of the wall opposite their point of entry and clear to the left if moving toward the left, or to the right if moving toward the right. They stop short of their respective team member (either the number 1 man or the number 2 man).

e. The team members move toward their points of domination, engaging all targets in their sector. Team members must exercise fire control and discriminate between hostile and noncombatant room occupants. Shooting is done without stopping, using reflexive shooting techniques. Because the soldiers are moving and shooting at the same time, they must move using careful hurry. shows all four team members at their points of domination and their overlapping sectors of fire.)

585x436http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/policy/army/fm/3-06-11/image1273.gif[/img]

581x432http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/policy/army/fm/3-06-11/image1274.gif[/img]

561x208http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/policy/army/fm/3-06-11/image1275.gif[/img]

505x231http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/policy/army/fm/3-06-11/fig3-31.gif[/img]

2-2. Three and Two-Man teams

[align=left]When full four-man teams are not available for room clearing three- and two-man teams can be used. The figures below show the points of domination and sectors of fire for a three-man clearing team. And show the same thing for a two-man team.

524x415http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/policy/army/fm/3-06-11/image1277.gif[/img]

545x419http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/policy/army/fm/3-06-11/image1278.gif[/img]

503x375http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/policy/army/fm/3-06-11/image1279.gif[/img]

504x388http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/policy/army/fm/3-06-11/image1280.gif[/img]

-The rest is still a W.I.P. as I'm getting ready to leave for work, It will be updated later today or tomorrow-

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Cipher    0

Some good shit here man, real-life combat skills that can be translated quite easily to DayZ. +1

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Frosty    0

Very well made guide. The breaching and clearing pictures really let you see how it's done. +1

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Diamond    0

Damn roosky! You can't give away our tactics like that! We must stay elite! You're such a fucking beast, well this guide will make me a dominant super soldier like yourself ;)

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Mr. night    4

Aye, now I can be an elite MLG PvPer, but in all seriousness this is a great guide, people need to learn to stop running around like a chicken without a head in firefights. :)

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Raptor    173

Must read guide for any super soldier character. Now we can be tacti-COOL ;)

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KpopKilla    74

Decent guide the only addition I would make is write the roles that each individual has in a stack before entering the building. For example your pictures show no one in the fire team pulling rear security.

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Raptor    173

Don't forget to cover the "Fatal Funnel" strategy. Very useful in hostage situations.

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RedSky    123

Oh man this gives me nostalgic vibes this is what I got tought playing milsims, I love this stuff. And it's well written aswell!

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Nottshack    0

This is really nice, in the arma 3 unit where I am in, we are using the same method during MOUT (Military Operations in Urban Terrain), it really helps but you have to make your movements fast and be smart in these kind of area's such as 3 store buildings or more, I also use it sometimes in DayZ, but yeah, this is really helpfull!

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