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Teas

Map Reading and Navigation

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Teas    1

In this basic tutorial I will cover a few things on the topic of Map Readin and Nav.

More focused on route selection than actual map reading skills I will cover the following:

Planning Considerations

Before Execution

On the Move

Planning Considerations

Speed, distance and time. (DST Triangle)

This relates to a helpful equation you can utilise when plannning a route.

cfe18335f5.png

Essentially if you have any two figures you can work out the third.

Distance divided by Time = Speed

Distance divided by Speed = Time

Speed x Time = Distance

Relief and going

"Relief" is the undulation of the ground, essentially the contour lines on the map denote the relief (high and low points) features on the ground. Study these in the planning phase to work out the best, not necessarily the easiest, route for you. "Going" is the term for the quality of the ground underfoot, ie firm, marsh, wetlands, babies heads (small ankle breaking mounds), etc. The conventional signs on your map will identify these areas of avoidance or selection.

Ease of navigation

The route should be easy to navigate, so when planning look for features that can easily be identified enroute. ie, areas of highground, specifically shaped woodblocks, water features, etc. This will aid you in navigating your route without having to always refer to your map.

Hazards and safety

This could be anything from identifying a cliff face you must go over around to a river crossing. Is your route suitable for your party/equipment? Is the small stream you saw on the map 100m wide requiring a river crossing? Is it necessary? All questions you have to ask yourself, does the risk outweigh the reward for that particular section of your route?

Good map study

Military Recce Patrols go into isolation for 48 hours prior to a patrol to prepare and plan their operations, this includes a detailed map study. Relate your map to the ground and create a picture in your mind of what is there.

Divide route into legs/Route card

Every member of your section/patrol should carry and be conversant with the route card created. This is essentially a small piece of waterproof card with a detailed written plan of your route.

It should include the following:

C/P (Check point), Grid From/To, Bearing, Distance/Time, Description

Each part of the route is split into "legs" each with it's own info from the above sections.

So "leg 1" would look something like this:

01 SU123456 SU124567 2300mils 200m/6 minutes

Description

Follow tree line for 50m South to small stream, turn East at small stream and follow for 100m to clearing, continue 50m to far Eastern edge of clearing.

Then the next leg would begin from this grid and so on until you reach your destination.

Before Execution

Relate the map to the ground

Once out on the ground it is important to relate your map to the ground before you set off. This means "orientating" the map so it faces and reflects your direction of travel.

Pick out obvious features for use in navigating

As with the planning phase you will have identified features that are easy to navigate by, ie high ground, specifically shaped woodblocks, etc. Now you are out actually looking upon the ground your map reflects, it may make sense immediately or you may find you see an obvious feature previously overlooked during your map study. Use these features to aid you whilst travelling. It negates having to walk carrying the map and looking at it all the time.

Note the start time

Important for your planned route as you cannot know how long you have taken between legs if you do not note the start time. It also gives you the opertunity to realise you have gone wrong, should your current leg be planned for 10 minutes and you take 15, it's time to check nav and see where you went wrong.

On The Move

Look towards features that can be identified on the map

Again this is for ease of navigation, use obvious features to navigate, not actually approaching them but keeping them in view can let you estimate your direction and location easily.

Check compass before changing direction

Always check your compass before changing direction. This is to give yourself and extra failsafe should you go wrong at any point. And to gain that warm fuzzy feeling that you are following your route correctly. Have the confidence to trust your compass.

Repeat procedure on each leg

At the end of one leg and before the next one begins, repeat the above procedure. Avoiding small mistakes can negate larger ones in the future.

Pacing

Pacing means counting your footsteps to estimate distance on the move. My pacing for 100m is 68 left footfalls walking and 34 running, everytime my left foot touches the ground is 1 pace. So I know every 68 paces walking is 100m. To get your pacing measure out 100m and walk counting your left footfalls, evertyone is slightly different, know your pacing!

Check nav regularly

Check navving is the responsibilty of everyone in the patrol/party. A check nav is at any point taking a knee and checking your map. Do this whenever you feel it is necessary, and have someone do it seperate from the lead scout/front person.

This along with my other guides are written with the intention of adding a sense of realism to the role-play you do in-game. These are all real life skills that can sometimes, not always, translate well to actions we take in Chernarus. I hope they remain somewhat useful or interesting.

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Ghost of Levi    8

Decent guide, But I cant help to think that it is literuarly copied and pasted over.

Also what should be taken into concideration while mapreading, which ALOT of people forget is how old the map is, If you have an map that is released yesterday, than north is actually north ( actual and map north ) but if your map is 5 years old north no longer is north, this wont be making a difference in shorter distances but if you were to travel 20 Km you might end up 100 M from where you were supposed to be.

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Decent guide, But I cant help to think that it is literuarly copied and pasted over.

Also what should be taken into concideration while mapreading, which ALOT of people forget is how old the map is, If you have an map that is released yesterday, than north is actually north ( actual and map north ) but if your map is 5 years old north no longer is north, this wont be making a difference in shorter distances but if you were to travel 20 Km you might end up 100 M from where you were supposed to be.

That is why there are 3 Norths on a map.

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Guest   
Guest

Kinda cool guide ♡

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Guest Zahk   
Guest Zahk

Looks real helpful I will be sure to use this.

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