Jump to content
Server time: 2017-10-18, 07:46
Safe Zone: CLOSED

DayZ maintenance is in progress

Sign in to follow this  
Franz

The Milgram Experiment

Recommended Posts

Franz    0

So my today's homework in my psychology class is answering questions regarding the Milgram Experiment (too lazy to explain about what it is, so here take a link; I suggest you read most of the article in order to be informed).

One of the questions is: Are the actions of the teacher (T) ethically questionable (in case he decides to go up to the highest possible electric shock) or is he in no way at fault due to him just following the experimenter's (E) instructions ?

I myself am not too sure what I should think of this, but I believe it is the teacher's (T) fault, even if they claim to just be following orders (Note: 70% of the tested persons claim they indeed just did that).

I am interested as to what others think of this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hex    31

Hmmm, to be fair, this could go either way, at least thats the general vibe I get from the question. Personally, if T is under the instruction of E, then it is E's fault

But then its just a case of 'I was just following orders!' .....and we all know how that turned out....eh Franzy~?

Hint hint nudge nudge

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Biiddy   
Guest Biiddy

do your own homework FranZ!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Franz    0

Hmmm, to be fair, this could go either way, at least thats the general vibe I get from the question. Personally, if T is under the instruction of E, then it is E's fault

But then its just a case of 'I was just following orders!' .....and we all know how that turned out....eh Franzy~?

Hint hint nudge nudge

But T can stop the experiment at any time as long as he speaks up against E (E normally says something like: 'This experiment is important for science !' And tries to convince T to keep going)

EDIT: And yes, I know how it ended *winks* This experiment was used to test if soldiers who worked in concentration camps indeed just followed orders.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cedrea    1

I'd say it's T's fault for following E's orders without questioning what are the effects of his actions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Valkerion    0

I'd say it's T's fault for following E's orders without questioning what are the effects of his actions.

Basically this at the end of the day T is responsible for his/her own actions regardless of what E said to him/her thats my opinion of it however E holds some responsibility for convincing T to do it in the first place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest The Reverend   
Guest The Reverend

I have studied this before, and here is what I have put down, briefly:

It is all about peer pressuring someone into following the orders. The "commander" was telling the "teacher" to push the button, which some of the subjects did and some refused to.

You cannot exactly say it is Ts fault, due to him being pushed to do so, but he is involved in this. If a person is intimidated, he either fights for himself or follows the orders. It all depends on who the "teacher" was, what kind of a person he is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cedrea    1

If you think about it there's the individual's ability to question 'orders' or to simply follow them. Pretty much it comes down to this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×