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Server time (UTC): 2021-10-18 07:14

Official parts for new pc £700


mrbling21

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  • MVP

Ok it's my bday on 20 January and I want. To build a se mi budget pc able to record with playable fps just need suggestions on a complete set I have a semi idea ATM but I'm on holiday and my notepad file is at home will link when I get home

If you just want to build a pc that can record without dropping FPS, you could just invest in an internal Capture Card. That is what I use to record my gameplay (and I don't experience any fps drop at all, even after recording for 14+ hours).

Off the top of my head (Sorry, I'm going out soon, so I can't find links to parts themselves) You'll want something like:

4 - 6 core Intel or 6 - 8 core AMD

8GB - 16GB DDR3

Z77 Chipset Motherboard (ATX of course)

600W - 750W PSU

SSD Drive (Primary) + 1TB HDD (Secondary) (or a Hybrid Drive)

NVIDIA or AMD Graphics Card (Preferably AMD if you get a AMD CPU)

A Big Case with 3 120mm or larger fans (fans are cheap to buy)

And an Internal Capture card if you want to record without FPS loss.

Note with CPU's: physical cores are faster/better than Hyperthreaded cores. So don't assume a Hyperthreaded Intel 4-core processor is faster or equal to an 8-core AMD processor.

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  • Emerald

My comp cost me way under £700 to build.

Get any newish intel i5 like a 2500k, 3450, 3570k.

Any LGA 1155 Chipset Mobo. (I got the cheapest Z77 I could find, an Asus P8Z77 LX)

550W PSU (Enough for a powerful CPU and single-gpu/dual medium gpus)

A few case fans (dirt cheap, about a fiver each)

Spend as little as possible on the case, I got an Xigmatek Asgard which has plenty of room and cooling spaces.

As for ram, just get the cheapest 1600mhz ddr3 you can find that's a decent brand.

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Nah. Just get pen. Position the gpu on top and mark how much you need to cut. Then just use pliers (pihdit) and just cut what you need. Nothing facy dremeling ;)

Wont brake your case. You will sacrifice few 3,5 inch slots but i doubt you keed that many anyways.

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  • MVP

Just a question that if you have AMD chip will you get somekind of boost if you also have AMD GPU?

No, they just seem to run better together, rather than having an Intel CPU and an AMD GPU. I have no clue why this is, but from what I've noticed, you have less issues with AMD & AMD than Intel & AMD.

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Just a question that if you have AMD chip will you get somekind of boost if you also have AMD GPU?

No, they just seem to run better together, rather than having an Intel CPU and an AMD GPU. I have no clue why this is, but from what I've noticed, you have less issues with AMD & AMD than Intel & AMD.

Currently I'm running on an Intel Core i7 860 @ 2.80GHz Quad-Core with a NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680. Do you know if this kind of mixture also causes issues? And which issues? I was running on an AMD Radeon before getting my new GPU, though it seemed to be running pretty well, nonetheless.

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  • Emerald

Ruffboi with your current setup, your CPU is most likely bottlenecking your GPU.

You have the creme de la creme without the 690 sugar on top, when it comes to graphics yet you have a low end lynnfield i7 from 3 years ago with a humble clockspeed.

Upgrade to a new i5 and you should see a notable performance increase.

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  • MVP

Currently I'm running on an Intel Core i7 860 @ 2.80GHz Quad-Core with a NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680. Do you know if this kind of mixture also causes issues? And which issues? I was running on an AMD Radeon before getting my new GPU, though it seemed to be running pretty well, nonetheless.

No, NVIDIA cards generally work well with any processor you use. And AMD GPU's will work with Intel, I just hear a lot of complaints about driver conflicts and slowdowns from people who do mix Intel and AMD. This is more hearsay than anything, I don't know of any actual proof of it. I just hear AMD GPUs and CPUs work better together than Intel CPUs and AMD GPUs.

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  • MVP

Rel I'm replacing my bulldozer in 2 days with an ivybridge i5.

I'll tell you if I have any issues or conflicts with my HD7850.

Sure, try to see if it runs faster or slower (better/worse frames). I've never heard of any serious problems with it, but some people seem to make it out to be much more work to set up properly. This could just be poor comp management/driver conflictions though.

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Ruffboi with your current setup, your CPU is most likely bottlenecking your GPU.

You have the creme de la creme without the 690 sugar on top, when it comes to graphics yet you have a low end lynnfield i7 from 3 years ago with a humble clockspeed.

Upgrade to a new i5 and you should see a notable performance increase.

Why a new i5 and not an i7?

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  • Emerald

If your using your PC primarily for gaming there is little reason to get an i7.

In many gaming benchmarks, an i5 3570k, significantly cheaper than all i7s is superior to an i7 2600 and 2700k versions.

The i7 3770k offers perhaps a slight advantage in terms of gaming performance.

For around €100 more than the i5.

The reason for all this is that gaming does not utilise hyperthreading, the i7's main selling point over the i5 chips.

So, there is almost no reason to get an i7 unless you are regularly doing tasks like video encoding, photo editing et cetera which could utilise the extra threads an i7 offers.

Also if you were running a 3 or 4 GPU set up having an i7 would help you catch up with your huge graphics rendering power.

i5s also scale well when overclocked, so for example a 4.5Ghz OC on a 3570k would mean noticably superior performance to a 3770k at stock speed.

So, when choosing a cpu, asess your needs.

What do I mainly use my PC for?

How often do I use applications that would benefit from multiple cores and hyperthreading?

Am I looking to overclock my hardware to gain a performance boost?

Is that little advantage really worth that huge wad of cash more?

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If your using your PC primarily for gaming there is little reason to get an i7.

In many gaming benchmarks, an i5 3570k, significantly cheaper than all i7s is superior to an i7 2600 and 2700k versions.

The i7 3770k offers perhaps a slight advantage in terms of gaming performance.

For around €100 more than the i5.

The reason for all this is that gaming does not utilise hyperthreading, the i7's main selling point over the i5 chips.

So, there is almost no reason to get an i7 unless you are regularly doing tasks like video encoding, photo editing et cetera which could utilise the extra threads an i7 offers.

Also if you were running a 3 or 4 GPU set up having an i7 would help you catch up with your huge graphics rendering power.

i5s also scale well when overclocked, so for example a 4.5Ghz OC on a 3570k would mean noticably superior performance to a 3770k at stock speed.

So, when choosing a cpu, asess your needs.

What do I mainly use my PC for?

How often do I use applications that would benefit from multiple cores and hyperthreading?

Am I looking to overclock my hardware to gain a performance boost?

Is that little advantage really worth that huge wad of cash more?

True it is.

Could you perhaps find me a good piece of i5, if you'd take the time? I'm personally not a master of hardware, as my interest and knowledge lies with the software-part of computers, so I'd rather have one with better experience look over such things.

If you will, please throw me a PM with it. :)

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No, they just seem to run better together, rather than having an Intel CPU and an AMD GPU. I have no clue why this is, but from what I've noticed, you have less issues with AMD & AMD than Intel & AMD.

Its a lie, but its a lie AMD would like to keep alive to boost sales.

If you have any problems then it would indeed be because of poor management or workmanship. :)

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  • MVP

No, they just seem to run better together, rather than having an Intel CPU and an AMD GPU. I have no clue why this is, but from what I've noticed, you have less issues with AMD & AMD than Intel & AMD.

Its a lie, but its a lie AMD would like to keep alive to boost sales.

If you have any problems then it would indeed be because of poor management or workmanship. :)

Funny, because I only heard it from people who had those issues which made them hate and never use AMD again, lol.

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